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Category: Hawaiian-Style

Hawaiian mindsets and values

BEYOND STUFF-LOVE (Part 3): A Touch Test

BEYOND STUFF-LOVE (Part 3): A Touch Test

18th-century British textile designer, poet, writer and socialist activist William Morris famously advised:  “Have nothing in your house that you do not know to be useful, or believe to be beautiful.”

It’s become a sort of go-to standard that organizers, minimalists and de-clutterers of every ilk use to look at the stuff with which we all surround ourselves.

These days every time you hear that phrase, you can pretty much expect that somebody is going to try to persuade you to get rid of some beloved something.

The perpetrator of the phrase may even hand you some sort of condescending, mealy-mouthed, holier-than-thou thing about your “unhealthy” attachments to “mere material objects.”

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WHEN MAGIC HAPPENS

WHEN MAGIC HAPPENS

It was at a festival celebrating taro and community in Hana that I saw another one of them — an intense, prepubescent boy who carried an ukulele around wherever he went.

I noticed him sitting on the grass very close to the front of the low-built stage under a big canvas tent.  He sat there, soaking in the presence of a musician who was making a name for himself in the big city of Honolulu and beyond and doing his town proud.

The boy was absolutely focused, strumming his old, well-used ukulele, frowning in concentration as he tried to match his hero’s fingerings and licks.  He was rapt in the music and transported to a world that was only sound and touch and heart. 

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SEE THE WHOLE GLASS (AND USE IT)

SEE THE WHOLE GLASS (AND USE IT)

We know the cliché – the glass with the water and the accompanying question delivered by some snot of a snippet:  Is the glass half-full or is it half-empty?

We think we know what the guys in the white coats say about choosing one thing over the other means too.

Over and over we’ve been told that if you say the glass is half-full, then you are probably an optimist.  If you say the glass is half-empty, then you’re a pessimist.

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HOW TO LIVE WISDOM

HOW TO LIVE WISDOM

In 2011, a video of a kid speechifying after learning to ride a bike went viral.  His dad “interviewed” him after his accomplishment, asking him whether he had any “words of wisdom” for all the other kids who wanted to ride a bike.

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PERSONAL BRANDING JAMMIN’ — TAKE 2

PERSONAL BRANDING JAMMIN’ — TAKE 2

Try it.  Google “personal branding.”

Wo.  See that?  The little search ‘bots retrieve 297 MILLION results!

Since leadership guru Tom Peters first presented the concept of marketing yourself and your career just like a brand in that article, “The Brand Called You” for Fast Company magazine in 1997, the thing has developed some legs and has taken off running in all directions.

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FIND THE SAVOR

FIND THE SAVOR

One of my favorite Einstein quotes is this:  ‘There are only two ways to live your life. One is as though nothing is a miracle. The other is as though everything is a miracle.‘  Of all his theories, I think, it’s the best one.

Life is either sacred or it isn’t.  Life is either amazing, just as it is, or it’s not.

You don’t even have to be a big brain to figure out that acting as if everything is a miracle and trying to respect and celebrate that premise as a “fact” will probably have different consequences than acting as if nothing is a miracle and, therefore, it doesn’t really matter what you do.

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YOUR TURN TO TRY

YOUR TURN TO TRY

Here’s another way of Un-Seeing, one involving time and space.

Google what “Hawaiian time” means and you will probably get some variation of “late.” Sometimes the definition comes with a fifteen-minute grace-period added and, often, there’s a bit of humor-filled tolerance included.

As more than one entry so delicately puts it, we island people are afflicted by a “relaxed indifference to precise scheduling.”  Uh-huh.

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IN GIVING WE TRUST

IN GIVING WE TRUST

I was listening to a soon-to-be ex-tenant of mine ranting on about how the past two years of her life spent on a little island in the Pacific that the P.C. (Politically Correct) crowd touted as the dream place to live had been most unsatisfactory.

Her body held rigidly erect as she stood flat-footed on the ground, she had thrown down her bandana and was giving up.  “Going home,” she said.  “I’m going home.”

And then there was a truly heartfelt cry.  “Where’s the ah-low-haw?” she blared.

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SONG OF PROTEST

SONG OF PROTEST

Every Hawaiian song is a poem, built with words that come from a feeling heart.   The songs are called “mele” and one who writes them is called a “haku mele,” one who braids words and music together that allows one heart to touch another.

Just as there are songs that celebrate beauty, love, and all of the other feel-good parts of life and songs that honor respected leaders and foster pride in a people, there are also songs that express anger, sorrow, pain, and resistance.  (They, too, are a part of life, after all, and Hawaiian songs and poems do express all of life.)

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